Tankerton Beach, Summer
















SOLD

My novel The House of fortune - available on Amazon - 

On the remote far north east coast of Qatar a village awaits the return of its menfolk from long days of diving for pearls. It’s the summer of 1928 and life is hard. Pearling is the only means of income and if the divers don’t do well the villagers won’t be able to survive.

The Al Bahr family live in Al Mafjar and Al Khor; some are fortunate, some are not. Lubna Al Bahr will have to marry soon but who will her parents choose for her? Despite the hardships, she is happy living a simple life with her mother, father and brother in the village but all this could soon end.

Through the turmoil of war and political struggle in the Middle East ‘The House of Fortune’ follows the family through the decades, interchanging with events in Cairo, Kuwait and Qatar where just as the colonial days appear to be over, oil becomes the focus of attention.

Now Qatar is the richest nation on earth but what was it like in the formative times of the 50s, 60s and early 70s as a nation was created? The simple ways of the desert and the sea yield to the demand for development. The Al Bahr family try to change with the times and one particular house becomes the focus of daily life, but can those within its walls adapt to the dramatic circumstances they face?

Long Tide, Broadstairs

Acrylic on Canvas

40" x 40"

SOLD


On the Promenade, Swalecliffe

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 40cm


£220


Framed

The House of Fortune


Original painting which became the front and back cover for the book 

The house on which the story os based still exists in the centre of Doha. Known as the wind tower house it became a museum and is now open to the public. 

I tried to capture the feeling of freedom in the desert and the sea..... those colours have remained with me since I lived in the Middle East for twenty five years until 2000. 


The Amir's palace is in the centre, on  higher ground. The only other building is a mosque. 


Acrylic on Canvas  90cm x 60cm - not for sale at the moment

Whitstable Harbour

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"  SOLD

Whitstable Harbour, Acrylic on Canvas SOLD

Margate Beach
Acrylic on Canvas
100cm x 100cm
SOLD

Home Alone - Dungeness

Acrylic on Canvas

90cm x 60cm


£400

Below the Surface

Acrylic in Canvas

90cm x 90cm

£450

Private Path

Dungeness

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 30cm 


£200


Winter, Whitstable

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 30cm


£200

French Window\

Acrylic on Canvas

36cm x 26cm

£200

Our Little Beach

Acrylic on Canvas

36cm x 26cm

SOLD

Sunday on 'The Street', Whitstable 

40cm x 40cm

£220

Framed

SOLD

Nancy Astor's House, Sandwich Bay

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Twilight, Sheppey

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 40cm

£120

Sheerness

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 40cm

SOLD



Exhibition at Lombard Street Gallery

Viking Bay, Broadstairs

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

SOLD

Margate across the bay from Westgate

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Harty Ferry, looking across to The Ferry Inn, Harty, Sheppey

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Herne Bay, Winter

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Margate Beach, Winter

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Shipwright's Arms, Hollowshore, Faversham

Acrylic on Canvas

12" x 12"

£120

Iona

Watercolour

£75

Lombard Street

Gallery

East Quay
Whitstable

Acrylic on
Canvas

100cm 
x
50cm

£450
Framed

St.John's Hospital, Canterbury

Acrylic on Canvas

40cm x 40cm

SOLD

Nothing with Nothing

Acrylic on Canvas

40"x 40"

£550

Framed


At Lombard Street Gallery

as part of the Journeys with The Wasteland exhibition in conjunction with Turner Contemporary

Coast at Svarte, Skåne, Sweden

Watercolour


£75

Svarte Sweden  Watercolour  £75

Below the Surface

acrylic on Canvas

40" x 40"

£650

Sketch of Summer

40" x 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

SOLD

Summer Day, Viking Bay

40" x 40"

Acrylic on Canvas 

£650    SOLD

At Lombard Street Gallery, Margate

The Joy of Summer

40" x 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

£650 SOLD

At Lombard Street Gallery, Margate


                                       Nothing with nothing……….



When faced with the challenge of responding T.S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land and in particular

On Margate Sands I was initially at a loss to know what to do. Like many of us I never realised that Eliot had visited Margate let alone included it in his most famous work.


Having read the poem a few times and concentrated on the Margate part I tried to get into the poet’s mind. Not easy! Like Joyce’s Ulysses it is a literary masterpiece but extremely difficult to work out what everything means. I resorted to Google to find out more about the poet and his Margate sojourn. The first great revelation for me was that he wrote or at least composed the Margate lines while sitting in the Nayland Rock shelter opposite the station overlooking Margate Main Sands. Ever since I’ve been fortunate enough to have my work at Lombard Street Gallery I’ve gazed out to sea from  the shelter eating  my cheese and pickle sandwich either on the way from or to the station. In fact my first big sale at Lombard was ‘Margate Beach, Winter’ which I painted using sketches and photographs from that very spot.  

Margate Beach, Winter


So without realising it I was already ‘in the zone!’


Since that first painting I’ve tried to continue to capture the unique atmosphere of Margate Main Sands especially off season where the sun seekers and sandcastle builders make way for the wanderers and wonderers. When the tide is out and the weather is grey and dull the sky, sea and sand take on a mysterious feel; a couple walking their dog now join in the mood of the light, perhaps outwardly content but maybe there’s a melancholy within. 





In ‘Silent Conversation’ my aim was to capture this mood. Perhaps the two figures are enjoying the calm space. On the other hand they might not be quite so happy! It’s up to you.

 

Trying to grapple with T. S. Eliot I tried to imagine the man down in Margate. What was his state of mind? Why was he there is the first place? How was his relationship with his wife? 


In some ways Margate beach is a wasteland in its own right.The vast expanse, packed with people in the summer, now takes on a desert. The desert before us could also create a desert in the mind. 


When taking on the painting I envisaged a large beige canvas. I would normally put in a sliver of sea and probably a quarter of the painting would be sky. However here I decided to have the whole thing as sand enhancing the desert feel. It could be abstract with perhaps a few shapes indicating the moods and expressions of how I felt about the particular lines of the poem. However as I’ve been painting more and more figures in my work, even though they are usually just a couple of brush strokes to indicate the shape I really wanted to paint the man himself. This was a challenge iI wrestled with for some time. 


Then on the way back from the gallery I went to the shelter and looked out to sea. It wasn’t particularly inspiring as there were diggers creating sand barriers for the Winter. It was a freezing cold day and my hands could hardly hold my sandwich. Although I’d brought my sketchpad and  paints I wasn’t in the mood to draw there and then. So I stood at the nearby railing and miraculously the sun came out creating beautiful strong shadows. I started taking pictures. I snapped away at the sand and there before me was ME. In shadow. With the railings. Suddenly I felt energised. That was it - the SHADOW. I’d found my painting. The shadow of me was Eliot. Nothing with Nothing. It  all made sense. Shadows are nothing. The space was nothing. I raced back to the studio and put brush to canvas.


Referring back to the poem we have to remember that Eliot’s journey down the Thames ends here at the estuary so there is a sense of the rotting and decomposing rather than the vibrancy of the river in full flow. Eliot himself was sketching as he sat in the shelter at Nayland Rock.


In ‘The Hollow Men’ Eliot writes these two lines:


Shape without form, shade without colour

Paralysed force, gesture without motion


and later


Between the conception

And the creation

Between the emotion

And the response

Falls the shadow



In the end my painting ‘nothing with nothing ………’ is a simple one in an attempt to


understand in some way this part of Eliot’s ‘The Waste Land.’ Shadows, mists, ghosts, 


swirling winds and a barren landscape; a figure standing alone, a genius full of ideas and emotions

whose line ‘nothing with 


nothing’ speaks of nihilism

 

and an empty void but in 


fact is a double negative -


the positive creative spirit. 



Low Water, Broadstairs

Acrylic on Canvas

40" x 40"

£450

Reculver from Wantsum Way

50cm x 50cm

Acrylic on Canvas

SOLD

Sketch for the House of Fortune

The Hermitage, Dungeness


Acrylic on Canvas SOLD

Rainy November Night 

Whitstable Harbour

Acrylic on Board

45 x 37

£175

Framed

Warm Glow, Old Neptune

Whitstable


Acrylic on Board


45 x 37


SOLD

Sunday Market,

Simsrihamn, Sweden


Watercolour


£75

Swalecliffe Stones


Watercolour


Framed



£120

Mermaid Hut, Whitstable


Watercolour


Framed


£120



Fallen

Acrylic on Canvas

110x50


£450


Framed

Picnic Table, Svarte, Sweden


Watercolour


£75

East Quay

Acrylic on Canvas

100x50

£375               At Bay Leaf Coffee House, Mortimer Street, Herne Bay

The Village, Iona


Watercolour


£75

The Neptune

Acrylic on Canvas

100x50cm

£550

Framed

Yellow Line

Acrylic on Canvas

60x90

£550

Framed

Ascent of the Tillage Plot, Iona 


Watercolour 


£75

Post Office, Iona


Watercolour


£75

Isle of Sheppey from Whitstable

Acrylic on Panel

50x40

SOLD


Harty Ferry

Acrylic on Canvas

£120

SOLD

Night Lights, Harbour Street, Whitstable


Acrylic on Canvas 


£175


Framed

Sunny Side of The Street

Whitstable

Acrylic on Canvas

60 x 90

£550

Framed

Shipwright's Arms, Hollowshore

Acryic on Canvas

£120

Herne Bay, Winter

£120

Old Neptune, Whitstable

Acrylic on Board

40x30

£120

SOLD

Margate Beach Winter  Acrylic on Canvas  SOLD

Dungeness - Approaching the Little Railway
Acrylic on Canvas
72cm x 63cm
Framed
£450

Father, Son, and Sheppey

70x60

SOLD

Walkers on The Street   SOLD

Kitesurfers and Strollers, Whitstable - acrylic on panel 40x50 SOLD

WELCOME

Born in Whitstable in 1951 I've seen the little town grow over the years and now paint in watercolour, acrylic and sometimes oil. My work is usually based on the coast in and around Whitstable as well as the surrounding area. I love walking and much of my work is based on drawings made along the way. I currently exhibit at Betty Loves Bryan in Whitstable and Lombard Street Gallery, Margate.                                                                         

BETTY LOVES BRYAN

shop and gallery


108 High Street

Whitstable

CT5 1AZ


www.bettylovesbryan.com




LOMBARD STREET GALLERY


2 Lombard Street

Margate

CT9 1EJ



www.lombardstreetgallery.co.uk

 

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